The Top Five Best Shades Of Yellow For Your Front Door

In our last two articles, we looked at the top five best shades of both blue and red paint for your bespoke front door, so you could choose the perfect tone for your house to make it as aesthetically pleasing and welcoming as possible. But what if blue or red aren’t exactly the colours for you, regardless of what shade you use? Well, maybe yellow will suit your London front door and make your house look beautiful. In this blog, let’s take a look at our top five favourite shades of yellow that are just absolutely stunning for front doors, and we’ll give you a few ideas of when each shade is ideal for use. We hope this blog can help you pick the perfect paint colour for your front door so you can make your neighbours jealous!

  1. Yellowcake

The yellowcake shade of yellow is extremely bright and positive, and really suits your house on sunny days when there is a little shade but mostly bright light. It reflects light incredibly and adds a really upbeat and welcoming appearance to the outside of your house. Although it has an old timey feel and would suit a forties house, it still looks stunning today and you can absolutely get away with coating your bespoke front door in it!

  1. Classic Yellow

Just because it has classic in the name doesn’t mean you can definitely get away with this shade of yellow, but depending on the appearance and exterior of your house, it can compliment your architecture and design features very well. It’s quite a strong shade of yellow and in its purest form it’s likely to create a ghastly appearance if paired with some more dull colours – however, if your house has a lot of vibrant classic colours, then the classic yellow shade might just be perfect for it!

  1. Lemon

The lemon door shade of yellow is not so common, but it is really gorgeous and when paired with some attractive exterior house colours it can look very fabulous and add a welcoming, friendly feel to the outside of your house. It’s been used in a lot of Mediterranean style homes and can look pretty decent in the sunlight. You might want to be careful pairing it with some stronger colour tones, such as classic red, because depending on where your colours are distributed on the exterior of your house they can clash pretty badly. We recommend searching up some great examples of houses with lemon yellow front doors to see if your house’s design is suited for this shade.

  1. Pineapple

If you are going for a darker shade of orange, then pineapple might be a good choice for your bespoke front door. In fact, the pineapple shade of yellow actually looks fruity, so if you have a house with playful or positive looking architecture, then it might be a good paint choice for your front door. It is quite out there but it has been pulled off very well for so many different kinds of houses and depending on your architecture and the outside colours of your house, it can look really nice all year round.

  1. Canary

Canary is a brighter, less vibrant tone of yellow which can go really well with white colours and some simple house architecture. It doesn’t stand out too much or get in your face, but it’s pleasant, relaxed and very appealing!

The Five Best Shades of Blue for Front Doors

So you want to repaint your front door to make the outside of your home look more welcoming and to impress your neighbours. There are a lot of incredible colours you could choose among for your house’s front door to make it look absolutely fabulous. There are shades of red and purple which look undeniably outstanding. But we really love shades of blue, and in this blog post, we’ll show you the best of the best top five blue colours to paint your front door in!

  1. New York State of Mind

This shade of blue is just objectively gorgeous and rich. With the famous New York State of Mind shade of blue, as it is popularly known, you can add a strong and professional atmosphere to the outside of your house. It is an especially good colour if you have lots of visitors and want to portray your house as upper class, but don’t want to go for a wood or black door. The New York State of Mind colour blue is generally recognised as a classic or old school colour, and is very elegant. It is widely used and enjoyed by designers and houseowners. To be specific, the colour code of New York State of Mind is #365574.

  1. Simple Light Blue

There’s nothing better for a plain white house than a classic, light blue door. The light blue shade is timeless, and suits both aged and modern houses. It adds a friendly and welcoming feel to the outside of your house, and highlights how clean your home looks, while shining perfectly in the summer sun and matching the icy snow in the winter months, making it an all year round favourite shade of blue! However, some people argue that light blue looks too childish, so if you’re going for a professional or high class atmosphere, maybe the simple light blue isn’t the right colour shade for you.

  1. Hazy Blue

As the name suggests, the hazy blue shade is perfect if you want to add a warm, cozy feeling to your house. Just like the simple light blue shade, the hazy blue also is perfect all year round and adds a great vibe to your house, even if it is a lot darker. The colour is inspiring but also relaxing, and in the warmer months it is absolutely fantastic if you have a porch and want to sit down in the sun and enjoy your garden. It looks great with a variety of house architecture, and unlike simple light blue, it can go with older houses too.

  1. Royal Blue

Do you want a strong balance between attractive, professional and welcoming without a colour overload? If so, then you’re probably looking for Royal Blue. As an extremely common and well loved front door colour, royal blue makes both the outside and inside of your house look very smart and clean. It is a particularly highly recommended colour if you’re using it in combination with a red brick exterior. Royal Blue is specially good for historic houses or aged but beautiful buildings, and brings out the pride in your house!

  1. Beach Cottage Blue

Dark, proud blues too bold for your house? How about choosing a door colour that is an uplifting, positive and bright shade of blue? Beach cottage blue lightens up your house even on rainy days, and through every season. It is great for families and individuals, and really gives a friendly, happy aspect to the front of your house. We recommend beach cottage blue for bright brick houses, or really any home that is surrounded by a beautiful garden or some greenery. Beach Cottage Blue is a little like baby blue but less in your face, and it is considered a lot less childish by many people. Pick it if you just love life!

Did you enjoy our top five picks of the best shades of blue to paint your front door in? If you’re considering painting your front door in a shade of blue, we have a great collection of fantastic doors available at affordable prices and high standards of high craftsmanship. You can browse our range here, or read more blog posts by scrolling down. Thanks for reading!

How to repaint a worn wooden door

The Basics

A quick and easy way to revive a worn-down exterior door is by repainting it, and often this can be done with minimal preparation and without breaking the bank. Repainting your door can spruce it up and make the exterior of your house feel like home again. Improving and repainting your house’s front door can be finished in one day, with the bulk of the work completed in a single afternoon. In this blog article, we’ll show you the simple steps you should follow to get the perfect possible coating for your door, and how to do it quickly and efficiently.

Colour

Depending on your house’s location and style, the ideal colour for your bespoke front door can vary greatly, and it’s important to take some time to decide upon the perfect colour for you. While a bright, clean white can work with nearly every home and makes your house look beautiful and well-maintained, you might like a different tone or colour which matches the architecture and period of your house. Doing some basic research on door colours online can give you a good idea of a few great colour options for you!

Equipment and Preparing the Door

You’ll need some very basic and highly accessible equipment to get started with repainting your Victorian front door, and you might already have some of it at home if you’ve done something similar before. As well as wood paint for exterior surfaces in your chosen colour, and the crucial paint brush, you’ll need masking tape to protect areas you don’t want paint to touch, medium-grade sandpaper to prep the door, a roller and a tray, a cloth, and a flat-bladed scraper. To make removing the original coat easier, you can invest in chemical paint stripper.

Safety! Make sure to wear protective gloves, goggles and a mask if you’re dealing with dangerous paint.

When you’re preparing your door for repainting, you don’t have to remove all of the original coat right down to the timber. Instead, use medium grit sandpaper to scrape away a light amount of paint from the door. Be sure to rub in the direction of the wood grains. This will help the new layers of paint easily stick to the door and last longer. If you have chemical paint stripper, carefully but thoroughly cover the whole surface of the door with the stripper and ensure it seeps into any nooks and crannies. Again, this will ensure the old coat is removed effectively. When the stripper starts to bubble up, you know it is doing its job properly!

After leaving the door to rest for the recommended time on the package of the paint stripper, clean your flat-bladed scraper and cautiously scrape away layers of the original coat. Once the old paint has been removed fairly and equally across the door, neutralise the stripper by watering the door or using white spirit (this depends on the chemical stripper you used).

Use sandpaper held around a sanding block to erode away any thick areas of old paint and leave your door looking almost unpainted.

Applying the Paint

Painting your front door with your chosen colour is very simple, but getting the colour spread perfect across the entire surface can take just a little bit of time, so you should follow the steps closely to ensure you get the best coating.

Before applying any paint, give it a strong, thorough stir in order to mix up and fairly distribute the pigments in the paint, so that you won’t have any darker or lighter, or thicker or thinner, patches of coating on your door.

Once the paint has been all stirred up, don’t stall long before beginning the actual painting process. It’s recommended that you envision several imaginary “boundaries” on the surface of your door. Six or eight rectangular areas work best, and you should work on one at a top. Start from the top so that any tiny droplets of paint that run down don’t ruin any painting work you’ve already finished.

To get the blend right, paint carefully and lightly in the same direction as the wood grains and try to use an even coating on your brush each time. Go for equally lengthed strokes and try to blend each strip of paint into the one before it. Blend the patches into each other while the paint is wet so they have time to combine and cancel out any differences in pigmentation.

In simple terms, apply the paint cautiously and fairly across the door. You may need to do several coatings and we generally recommend this so that the paint is clearer, more resilient to weather and longer-lasting, so that you won’t have to apply a new coating any time soon. Depending on your type of paint, it could take anywhere from two to six hours for the paint to dry, but it’s usually okay to apply the next coating while the paint is only partially dry. Once you have applied enough coatings, leave the door to dry fully in a well ventilated space, and give it 24 hours just to be safe!

Conclusion

Well, there you go! Once the paint has dried, you can remove the masking tape, re-hinge the door and pack away your equipment. Grab a cup of tea and appreciate your handiwork! Ideally you should have a bold, clear and even coating of paint across your door’s surface with no blotches or scratches and none of the original coating of paint shaping through from behind. If anything looks off, it’s often fine just to take it off the hinges and give it another go over until it’s looking the way you envisioned.

Painting your front door can be a process but if done effectively with the right tools and the correct instructions, you can have it done within a day or two without facing any issues, and be left with a pristine, beautiful and good-as-new front door for your home sweet home!

How to inspect your old door frame.

If you are planning to buy a new Bespoke front door and think your old frame is still in good condition you can check this in 3 easy steps:

a. Check the frame for rot. Use a house key (not a screw driver or chisel, these are too sharp) to poke the cill and the bottom of the frame verticals. You are looking for soft timber. If you find soft timber then the frame is rotten and needs to be replaced.

b. Use a spirit level and tape measure to find out if the frame is square. Most frames are not square. If the verticals are more than 20mm off the vertical line then a new frame is required. If the head or the cill are more than 25mm off the horizontal line then a new frame is required. If the head or the cill are not level then you must tell the customer that the door will not look straight at the top or the bottom, but there is nothing you can do to change this unless you change the frame.

c. Check the frame for cracks/ splits. These can be caused by a break-in in the past. If there are splits around the hinges then the new hinges won’t carry the door and the door might drop. This means the frame must be replaced. If there are splits around the locks then the door may not be as secure and the frame might need to be replaced. If the splits around a lock keep are small, then a London bar might help to re-inforce the frame and the old frame could be kept.

When your frame pass all tests you can buy your dream period front door I our online shop at https://www.bespokefrontdoor.com/doors

How to Maintain Your Front Door Over the Years

In many ways, the Victorian front door of your house ends up defining it. It’s the first impression for both guests and passers-by, and it’s the lasting image that is most frequently associated with your home after leaving.

London front doors

Being the first image that comes to someone’s mind when they think of your home gives your front door a fair bit of importance. By maintaining it, you are upholding the view of your house and the way it looks. This means that you need to keep your front door looking healthy and well-cared-for, in order to maintain that curb appeal and the overall value of your house in high spirits.

 

Why Do Front Doors Lose Their Touch?

 

Whether your period front door is made from metal or wood, it’s only natural to witness natural wear and tear over the years, through its age and also poor weather conditions. You may notice that paint has started to fade or crack, coming off with the lightest of touches. You may also notice that wooden doors can begin to rot, as well as metal doors beginning to rust. Not only this, but doors also get damaged through natural use such as slamming and banging, weakening the paint and finish, or causing damage to the material underneath.

London door

How To Maintain Your Door

 

  1. The first thing to consider when maintaining your front door involves routinely checking it for faults. Inspect it often to see if the paint is coming off, or if you can see any rot. Similarly, if there’s some piece of the door that’s broken off or if there’s a hole in it, you will know that you need to seal it. Check-ups are the key to providing your front door with the care it needs.

 

  1. Secondly, painting and sealing your door efficiently is essential. Your door is subject to damage from water, UV rays, poor weather, and a number of other external factors. Invest in UV-blocking varnish and paint, and also quality oil to treat the wood.

 

  1. Thirdly, clean regularly. A simple solution of mild dish soap and warm water, used with a smooth cloth or sponge, is the best way to clean an exterior door. Wipe until no more dirt or dust is evident when you swipe across the surface and allow the door to dry.

 

  1. Take a closer look, if needed. For example, for older wood doors that require restoration, it’s best to take the door off the hinges, remove all the hardware, lay it across two sawhorses, and sand it down to the wood. This clears away any old paint, finish, or varnish, and allows you to see if the door has any cracks or other repair needs.

 

 

Maintaining your door and upholding the overall quality helps to preserve the image of your home in the eyes of other people and your own as well. Make time for regularly inspecting the quality of your door, and prevent damage by fixing issues as soon as you notice them.

Accoya® Is The Best Choice For Your Front Door

When choosing what your door should be made of, wood remains a popular choice – with thanks to its versatility, the attractiveness and uniqueness of each piece, and the fact it is generated from a natural source.

 

But strong aesthetics alone is not enough – especially when it comes to a safe and secure front door. Any material used needs to be highly robust, long-lasting and durable. Not to mention the appeal of blocking sound and conserving heat. When it comes down to it, it’s the quality of the wood that counts.

 

That is why we use Accoya®.

Victorian front door

What is Accoya® wood?

 

Accoya® timber is the world’s leading long-life wood. It is a timber that has been modified via a process called ‘acetylation’, which increases its durability, enabling it to resist rot, defy the elements and stay strong and resilient for decades to come – all without affecting its natural appearance.

 

From a sustainability perspective, while other types of durable woods tend to be slower growing species, Accoya® is made using fast-growing, sustainably forested radiata pine. Better yet, nothing is added to the wood that doesn’t naturally occur in it, making it an environmentally-friendly and sustainable timber.

 

And the benefits are endless…

 

Increased Stability

For most wood materials, temperature, humidity and poor weather conditions are all critical factors that can increase the likelihood of swelling and shrinkage, and in turn, can have unwelcome implications. With Accoya®, the risk is reduced by 75% or more, meaning you won’t need to worry about doors rotting, splitting, jamming or letting in drafts.

 

Great Durability

Lasting 50 years above ground, and 25 years in-ground or freshwater, Accoya® has Class 1 durability. This surpasses even teak. It forms an effective barrier to insect attack, being indigestible to microorganisms and insects and therefore more durable to wood-destroying fungi, and is virtually rot-proof.

London front doors

Versatility

Accoya® is the perfect choice for doors. The wood is easy to coat as it requires less preparation and sanding that others. Its improved stability also means coatings last up to two times longer, which reduces the need for maintenance.

 

Improved Insulation

In comparison to other commonly used hardwood and softwood species, Accoya® wood offers superior thermal insulation. This provides energy conservation advantages such as when used in applications including window frames as well as front doors – saving you money on your energy bills in the long-run.

London front door

Sustainability

Accoya® is sourced from FSC® and other regionally certified woods, meaning it is a naturally renewable material. It also provides compelling environmental advantages over slow-growing hardwoods and woods treated with toxic chemicals, meaning that Accoya® can be safely reused, recycled and incinerated.

 

When it comes to a new Bespoke front door, a lot of aspects need to be considered: from style, colour, size and hardware. However, one major feature to be mindful of is the material of the door. With Accoya®, you can guarantee an attractive, long-lasting, highly durable and easy-to-maintain door that will last through decades of use. What’s not to love?

Bespoke In: Purple

Whether it’s the sophisticated shade of plum or a light heather or periwinkle shade, purple is one of the most popular growing colour choices for London front doors, especially over warm summer months, representing wealth, honour, royalty and creativity. So, if you’re thinking of brightening up your home’s entrance, here are some of our favourite shades of purple for exterior doors.

Bespoke front door

Why Purple?

When it comes to purple, there are hundreds of shades and hues to choose from, especially with so many tone variations. It’s easy to see why it’s such a common and attractive choice to use as a front door colour, making even the most tired-looking exteriors pop with character and style. Not to mention, it makes a quick, easy and cheap update to add a big boost of curb appeal to your home.

 

If you’ve decided to refresh your facade with a purple bespoke front door, you’ll want to pick out a shade that works well with your current exterior style. Follow these tips to choose the shade for your home.

 

Shades We Love

 

  1. Plum

No other colour is quite as striking as a bold and vivid plum, and it captures the eyes of passers-by as they are instantly drawn to your vibrant facade. Not to mention, it looks stunning against any style of home, whether it’s an old traditional build or a more modern design.

London door

  1. Lilac

A lighter shade of purple with calming undertones, lilac offers a peaceful and tranquil feel to any home exterior. If you’re looking for a sophisticated and luxurious finish to offer timeless style that will be envied by all guests and neighbours, consider the light and delicate tones of lilac.

Victorian front door

  1. Grape

Be the envy of your block or neighbourhood with a bursting pop of colour to your home exterior. Grape is the new obsession, offering a chic and stylish look to any outdoor design. Being a brighter shade of purple, it’s important to consider the existing style of your home, as too many bright colours can instantly clash with a dramatic shade like grape. We recommend classic white trims and neutral brickwork and panels.

period front door

  1. Lavender

The softest shade of purple there is, lavender creates a soothing feeling of peace, tranquillity and bliss. It’s also a great choice for spring and summer, especially coupled with gorgeous natural greenery, potted plants and hanging baskets.

edwardian door

  1. Orchid

A purple orchid represents royalty, respect, admiration, and dignity. And it’s easy to see why. This bold shade makes a luxurious addition to the main entrance of your home, especially contrasted with white trims, natural greenery and neutral panel work.

georgian front door

Like what you see? Purple is a luxurious and dramatic colour to work with, but before you take the plunge, imagine your home in all seasons and consider the overall look in the area you live. It’s great to stand out, but worse to look amiss.

Installing Front Door Hardware

Whether it’s time for a brand new Bespoke front door, or just an update by replacing some worn-out hardware, we’ve put together a few handy tips for when it comes to installing a new handle and lock for your door.

As well as looking fresh and clean, adding a new handle and lock system is a great way to boost curb appeal to your home, showcasing the fact it is up-to-date, well-looked after, and also safe and secure.

Bespoke front doors

To begin, it’s vital to ensure your new handles will be the perfect fit. Firstly, consider the dimensions of the backplates to ensure they’ll cover old existing holes and fixtures. Secondly, check the backset. This is the distance from the edge of the door to the centre of the borehole for the doorknob assembly. Most handles you can purchase are compatible with the two standardized backset dimensions of 2 3/8 or 2 3/4 inches.

1. Installing the Latch

Insert the new latch assembly into the existing borehole in the edge of the front door. Make sure the latch bolt is facing in the correct direction. By this we mean, the curved side of the latch bolt should be facing the strike plate on the jamb as the door is closed. Secure the latch assembly’s faceplate to the door with the screws.

Bespoke front door

2. Joining the Handles

Align the exterior handle on the door by inserting the spindle or axle on the handle through the latch cylinder at a 90-degree angle. Then, carefully place the corresponding doorknob or lever on the interior side of the door, fitting the two parts together. It should feel slightly snug when the two parts join.

3. Deadbolts

Fit the latch bolt into the upper cross borehole, making sure the top is facing up. Then, screw the faceplate in to secure. Install the deadbolt mechanisms on the inside and outside, making sure the keyed cylinder part is on the outside of the door. The inside thumb turn should point up when unlocked, and point towards the door jamb when locked.

Victorian front door

4. Installing Strike Plates

Align the strike plate for the handle against the door jamb and attach using a couple of screws. Ensure that the lip of the strike plate is facing the direction in which the door opens out. Next, align the plate for the deadbolt, drill your holes, and install the strike plate to the door jamb with two screws for extra reinforcement.

5. Test

It’s vital to test your new handle and locks work correctly, or there could be danger of your house not being securely locked up if you should go out or lock-up for the night. Do some quick tests by shutting the door and checking to see if the handle sticks or binds. If it does, make sure the latch faceplate is flush with the door edge and doesn’t rub against the strike plate on the jamb. If the latch bolt isn’t properly aligned with the hole in the strike plate, remove the strike plate and use a chisel to extend the mortise in the direction needed to realign the bolt with the hole. Again, screw the plate back on and test the fit.

London door

Don’t be fooled!!!

Use company with 1st class Accoya timber.

We often get asked why our doors can be more expensive when compared to other companies and brands. And in order to answer this question, we decided to do some research into other products available on the market. Simply, at Bespoke Front Door, we use 1st Class Accoya, which typically has twice the value of a 2nd Class Accoya – which is the most commonly used material for other companies to offer better price. By using 1st Class Accoya, we can ensure a higher quality and longer-lasting door that withstands the test of time, throughout even the poorest weather conditions. By investing in 1st Class Accoya, you are saving money in the long-run, without the need for constant maintenance or replacement after just a few years, which is common for cheaper materials such as 2nd Class Accoya timber or MDF panels. Our priority will always be in using the best quality timber to provide the highest quality doors for our customers.

Please have a look at below pictures to compare wood quality.

Victorian doors

Thank you for your support and understanding,

Bespoke Front Door LTD

Top Tips For Painting Your Front Door

Sometimes, all it takes to fall in love with your home exterior all over again is a simple and inexpensive update – like a brand new coat of paint for your London front door. Whether you opt for a brand new vibrant colour, or just a fresh coat of a classic neutral, a new paint job can transform any tired-looking exterior into a beautifully vibrant facade, with instant curb appeal.

Bespoke front door

Better yet, you don’t need an expert or any fancy skills to tackle this fun weekend-project. We’ve outlined some helpful and easy-to-follow steps to help you on your way.

 

What Do I Need?

First things first, decide on your new door colour and have the paint readily available. Once the obvious is out of the way, put aside some painter’s tape, a sponge, a block of sandpaper, paintbrushes and foam rollers, paint primer, and some semi-gloss for the perfect finish.

 

  1. Preparation

In order to achieve the perfect coat, we recommend removing the door and placing it on a table or a pair of sawhorses in the garden, if you can. By doing this, it prevents drips or runny paint marks. It also means you can remove hinges and any other hardware to avoid getting paint in the hinges.

Victorian front door

  1. Cleaning and Sanding

Before starting any serious work, make sure to scrub down the door and remove any dirt or grime with a wet sponge. Then, once dry, lightly sand the surface to remove any build-up. It’s important to make the surface of your door as clean and smooth as possible in order to produce a neat and even paint job.

period front door

Once you have finished sanding, we recommend wiping down with a wet sponge once again to remove any dust. Again, leave the door to dry.

 

  1. Tape

Apply painter’s tape to all the areas of the door you want to avoid, including glass panels, letterboxes, hinges if still attached. This will help to protect those elements when it comes to painting.

 

  1. Prime

Apply the paint primer to your door using a foam roller, gradually working your way from one side of the door to the other. For trickier areas, like in between panel grooves, use a paintbrush. Allow the door to dry completely before painting.

 

  1. Painting

The next step is to start painting! Begin painting by coating the panels before heading on to the mainframe. Then, start to paint any vertical or horizontal panels with a foam roller, ensuring you get every nook and cranny. Allow to dry fully and then apply a second coat for a flawless finish.

london door

  1. Reinstall

After you’ve applied your paint and gloss, remove the tape and allow the door to dry. Then, you can begin reinstalling your door and attaching all the hardware. All that’s left is to enjoy your new front door colour and decorative accordingly with your personal preferences!