Best Shades of Red for your Front Door

The colour red is symbolic of royalty and majesty, and also love and friendliness. If you’re painting your bespoke front door, you should seriously consider choosing a shade of red as your colour. Painting your day red can make your house seem bold and respectable, and depending on the shade you pick, welcoming and friendly. In this blog article, we’ll look at our top five favourite shades of red to paint your period front door in! We hope this article will help you pick a great colour for your front door.

  1. Umbria Red

If you’re looking for a shade of red that is bold but not overwhelming or ghastly, and adds a positive, homely aspect to the exterior side of your house, then umbria red might be the perfect paint choice for you. If you have a wooden exterior house or white outside, then the pleasant red shade will contrast nicely and add a great aesthetic to your house! Umbria red is a wine colour and reflects royalty, but it won’t overwhelm visitors to your house and isn’t too in your face, like some other shades of red can be. It’s a readily available red paint, but it can get a little costly, so pick wisely.

  1. Tile Red

Instead of Umbria Red, you might want a stronger, richer and more vintage shade of red to paint your front door in. If this sounds like you, Tile Red is a great candidate for your front door. Its benefits are that it has a pleasant appearance and goes very well along with a beautiful garden or natural house exterior, and because it doesn’t contrast so strongly with the outside of your house, it won’t be quite as bold as Umbria Red. We recommend it for any house with a lot of greenery!

  1. Terracotta Red

For front door painters aiming to achieve a more Mediterranean feel for their house, or a shade of red that can compliment an offwhite, slightly orange house exterior, then the Terracotta Red is a fantastic choice. It has a classic and vintage feel, while also being a timeless choice for a front door. It looks especially fabulous in the sunshine and any visitor to your house will feel very welcome upon their arrival!

  1. Heritage Red

If the dimmer colours of red aren’t really for you but you still want that classic feel with a strong, bold aspect, then heritage red is likely to be the perfect shade of red for you. Heritage Red is designed to be a patriotic American colour and as a result it is very popular in the United States as a front door paint. It’s great in the summer months, but also has an appealing aesthetic when autumn and winter roll around.

  1. Chinese Red

Perhaps you want a shade of red that feels very welcoming and dense in culture, a colour that can nicely compliment a vibrant household that incorporates a range of other tones. If so, a bold red like Chinese Red might be a good choice for you. It stands out and is very glossy, and if you’ve ever been to China or really any Asian country, you’ll see how commonly used this shade is over there. It’s a fabulous choice if your home is daring and flashy. We hope this article has helped you pick out a nice shade of red for your front door. Maybe after reading through our favourite tones of red, you have decided that it isn’t the colour for you. Then, you may be interested in our other articles, like this one we wrote about the best blue front door colours.

How to repaint a worn wooden door

The Basics

A quick and easy way to revive a worn-down exterior door is by repainting it, and often this can be done with minimal preparation and without breaking the bank. Repainting your door can spruce it up and make the exterior of your house feel like home again. Improving and repainting your house’s front door can be finished in one day, with the bulk of the work completed in a single afternoon. In this blog article, we’ll show you the simple steps you should follow to get the perfect possible coating for your door, and how to do it quickly and efficiently.

Colour

Depending on your house’s location and style, the ideal colour for your bespoke front door can vary greatly, and it’s important to take some time to decide upon the perfect colour for you. While a bright, clean white can work with nearly every home and makes your house look beautiful and well-maintained, you might like a different tone or colour which matches the architecture and period of your house. Doing some basic research on door colours online can give you a good idea of a few great colour options for you!

Equipment and Preparing the Door

You’ll need some very basic and highly accessible equipment to get started with repainting your Victorian front door, and you might already have some of it at home if you’ve done something similar before. As well as wood paint for exterior surfaces in your chosen colour, and the crucial paint brush, you’ll need masking tape to protect areas you don’t want paint to touch, medium-grade sandpaper to prep the door, a roller and a tray, a cloth, and a flat-bladed scraper. To make removing the original coat easier, you can invest in chemical paint stripper.

Safety! Make sure to wear protective gloves, goggles and a mask if you’re dealing with dangerous paint.

When you’re preparing your door for repainting, you don’t have to remove all of the original coat right down to the timber. Instead, use medium grit sandpaper to scrape away a light amount of paint from the door. Be sure to rub in the direction of the wood grains. This will help the new layers of paint easily stick to the door and last longer. If you have chemical paint stripper, carefully but thoroughly cover the whole surface of the door with the stripper and ensure it seeps into any nooks and crannies. Again, this will ensure the old coat is removed effectively. When the stripper starts to bubble up, you know it is doing its job properly!

After leaving the door to rest for the recommended time on the package of the paint stripper, clean your flat-bladed scraper and cautiously scrape away layers of the original coat. Once the old paint has been removed fairly and equally across the door, neutralise the stripper by watering the door or using white spirit (this depends on the chemical stripper you used).

Use sandpaper held around a sanding block to erode away any thick areas of old paint and leave your door looking almost unpainted.

Applying the Paint

Painting your front door with your chosen colour is very simple, but getting the colour spread perfect across the entire surface can take just a little bit of time, so you should follow the steps closely to ensure you get the best coating.

Before applying any paint, give it a strong, thorough stir in order to mix up and fairly distribute the pigments in the paint, so that you won’t have any darker or lighter, or thicker or thinner, patches of coating on your door.

Once the paint has been all stirred up, don’t stall long before beginning the actual painting process. It’s recommended that you envision several imaginary “boundaries” on the surface of your door. Six or eight rectangular areas work best, and you should work on one at a top. Start from the top so that any tiny droplets of paint that run down don’t ruin any painting work you’ve already finished.

To get the blend right, paint carefully and lightly in the same direction as the wood grains and try to use an even coating on your brush each time. Go for equally lengthed strokes and try to blend each strip of paint into the one before it. Blend the patches into each other while the paint is wet so they have time to combine and cancel out any differences in pigmentation.

In simple terms, apply the paint cautiously and fairly across the door. You may need to do several coatings and we generally recommend this so that the paint is clearer, more resilient to weather and longer-lasting, so that you won’t have to apply a new coating any time soon. Depending on your type of paint, it could take anywhere from two to six hours for the paint to dry, but it’s usually okay to apply the next coating while the paint is only partially dry. Once you have applied enough coatings, leave the door to dry fully in a well ventilated space, and give it 24 hours just to be safe!

Conclusion

Well, there you go! Once the paint has dried, you can remove the masking tape, re-hinge the door and pack away your equipment. Grab a cup of tea and appreciate your handiwork! Ideally you should have a bold, clear and even coating of paint across your door’s surface with no blotches or scratches and none of the original coating of paint shaping through from behind. If anything looks off, it’s often fine just to take it off the hinges and give it another go over until it’s looking the way you envisioned.

Painting your front door can be a process but if done effectively with the right tools and the correct instructions, you can have it done within a day or two without facing any issues, and be left with a pristine, beautiful and good-as-new front door for your home sweet home!

How to Maintain Your Front Door Over the Years

In many ways, the Victorian front door of your house ends up defining it. It’s the first impression for both guests and passers-by, and it’s the lasting image that is most frequently associated with your home after leaving.

London front doors

Being the first image that comes to someone’s mind when they think of your home gives your front door a fair bit of importance. By maintaining it, you are upholding the view of your house and the way it looks. This means that you need to keep your front door looking healthy and well-cared-for, in order to maintain that curb appeal and the overall value of your house in high spirits.

 

Why Do Front Doors Lose Their Touch?

 

Whether your period front door is made from metal or wood, it’s only natural to witness natural wear and tear over the years, through its age and also poor weather conditions. You may notice that paint has started to fade or crack, coming off with the lightest of touches. You may also notice that wooden doors can begin to rot, as well as metal doors beginning to rust. Not only this, but doors also get damaged through natural use such as slamming and banging, weakening the paint and finish, or causing damage to the material underneath.

London door

How To Maintain Your Door

 

  1. The first thing to consider when maintaining your front door involves routinely checking it for faults. Inspect it often to see if the paint is coming off, or if you can see any rot. Similarly, if there’s some piece of the door that’s broken off or if there’s a hole in it, you will know that you need to seal it. Check-ups are the key to providing your front door with the care it needs.

 

  1. Secondly, painting and sealing your door efficiently is essential. Your door is subject to damage from water, UV rays, poor weather, and a number of other external factors. Invest in UV-blocking varnish and paint, and also quality oil to treat the wood.

 

  1. Thirdly, clean regularly. A simple solution of mild dish soap and warm water, used with a smooth cloth or sponge, is the best way to clean an exterior door. Wipe until no more dirt or dust is evident when you swipe across the surface and allow the door to dry.

 

  1. Take a closer look, if needed. For example, for older wood doors that require restoration, it’s best to take the door off the hinges, remove all the hardware, lay it across two sawhorses, and sand it down to the wood. This clears away any old paint, finish, or varnish, and allows you to see if the door has any cracks or other repair needs.

 

 

Maintaining your door and upholding the overall quality helps to preserve the image of your home in the eyes of other people and your own as well. Make time for regularly inspecting the quality of your door, and prevent damage by fixing issues as soon as you notice them.

Don’t be fooled!!!

Use company with 1st class Accoya timber.

We often get asked why our doors can be more expensive when compared to other companies and brands. And in order to answer this question, we decided to do some research into other products available on the market. Simply, at Bespoke Front Door, we use 1st Class Accoya, which typically has twice the value of a 2nd Class Accoya – which is the most commonly used material for other companies to offer better price. By using 1st Class Accoya, we can ensure a higher quality and longer-lasting door that withstands the test of time, throughout even the poorest weather conditions. By investing in 1st Class Accoya, you are saving money in the long-run, without the need for constant maintenance or replacement after just a few years, which is common for cheaper materials such as 2nd Class Accoya timber or MDF panels. Our priority will always be in using the best quality timber to provide the highest quality doors for our customers.

Please have a look at below pictures to compare wood quality.

Victorian doors

Thank you for your support and understanding,

Bespoke Front Door LTD

Bespoke In: Green

In the spring, green is a top favourite amongst the designers and craftsmen at Bespoke Front Door. We just love how a green door can boast a warm welcome, as well as calm and collected vibes. In fact, green is often recommended to homeowners who are trying to enhance curb appeal in order to sell their home, resulting in an increased demand for green.

 

Having been a popular choice since the Victorian period, if you’re planning to do just one thing to enhance your home’s attractiveness, investing in a bespoke front door finished in a shade of green could be an inspired move.

 

First of all, consider the shade of green and have a think about what tone would complement the age and style of your home’s architecture and surroundings. If you’re not sure which shade of green to paint your bespoke wooden doors, our designers will be happy to help.

 

We love…

Natural Sage

Softer shades like a natural sage or mint green are great choices for the exterior of Georgia and Victorian homes, contrasting beautifully with classic brickwork or white plasterwork. You can enhance the colour even further by incorporating some natural greenery to the surroundings of your door. Think potted plants, foliage or hanging baskets.

Victorian front door

Dark Racing Greens

This was a classic choice back in the 18th and 19th century, making it a traditional and iconic design that is still commonly used in and around London today. It makes a lush and powerful statement to any period home, especially when complemented with timeless polished brass door furniture, or even chrome fittings if you’re looking for a more contemporary edge.

period front door

Muted and Pastel Greens

One of our favourite shades would have to be pastel shades of green. It’s subtle, elegant and also enhances positive vibes for your home. The gentle shades of muted greens work beautifully against traditional red brickwork and also makes a smart companion for stained glass door panels.

Victorian doors

Olive Greens

Rich, grounded and glamorous. Olive tones are a superb choice for London townhouses in need of a more substantial and sophisticated look – especially when contrasted against iconic black and white porch tiles. Again, polished brass door furniture is a timeless choice, but chrome fittings also provide a clean and more modern appearance.

edwardian front doors

Handpainted

All of our Bespoke front doors are handcrafted and manufactured from strong and durable, hard-wearing timber that is guaranteed for at least ten years. We use Accoya® for these properties, renowned for its longevity and durability.

 

After the design concept,  but before each project leaves our workshop, our designers professionally and flawlessly apply your chosen paint colour by hand, ensuring no brush strokes or drip marks. The combination of the timber we use and paint we apply makes for a finished door that will withstand wear, tear and the elements. When the paintwork is of such good quality, a quick wipe with a damp cloth is all the care needed to ensure your door remains ‘evergreen’.

The Parts of Your House You Definitely Want to Check After Winter

The winters and snow are not fans of your house. Both of them can do some serious damage to your house. Harsh winters can affect all kinds of buildings apart from humans and animals. The cold wind is a source of precipitation which can cause water sources to freeze, and put a strain on your house. As unforgiving as winters are, they can bring a world of trouble for you when they finally end.

There are several problems caused by winters, mainly to the foundation of the house, roofs, etc.

Here are some parts of your house that may be potentially damaged by the cold and should definitely be checked out.

The Foundation

The foundation of the house is the most important part of the house because it is what your house rests on. A strong foundation means a strong house. However, the cold breeze of winter can cause some serious damage to foundations which could ultimately turn your house into a hazard.

Winters can freeze the soil under your house, making it extremely hard instead of soft and supportive. This freezing of soil can cause irreparable damage to the foundation of your house if left unattended. Hairline fractures in the concrete can develop into cracks, causing structural issues which could next affect the walls of the house

Therefore, it is best to hire a professional to check for frost heave, and if found, attend to it timely.

Bespoke front door

The Pipes

The piping of your house is also an integral part that needs to be regularly checked, especially during and after winters.

Low temperatures can cause water to freeze quickly, especially drainage systems. When this happens, the incoming flow of water increases in pressure and puts a strain on the pipes. This additional pressure and force significantly increase the chances of the bursting of pipes. What’s more, the pipes themselves can freeze up or break due to the cold. Hence, it is a must to check the whole discharge system for any damage at the hands of winter.

period front door

Front doors

All kinds of doors, be it interior or exterior, are damaged by winter. However, the front doors bear the brunt of the harsh winters, especially in London.

London front doors bear the brunt of nature’s harshest breeze and cold. If not protected, the cold winds or moisture-laden fog can cause period front doors to contract as well as crack. What’s more, Victorian front doors can absorb rain and precipitation and be damaged internally which is why your front doors need the proper protection to handle everything nature throws at you.

Victorian front door

The Roof

Roofs face a greater threat than front doors during the winter season. They face the harshest challenges in the form of wind, rain and the cold. The harsh winters can do a lot of damage, cause cracks as well as weaken the structure of the house as well as absorb drizzle and precipitation. Hence, it is important to protect your ceilings to the utmost.

Bespoke In: Pink

With an endless spectrum of colours to choose from, it’s one of the hardest decisions to make throughout your bespoke front door project.

We believe that every home is completely unique, and so each door should represent your home’s true character and personality. The best way to do this is with a paint job.

This year, more customers than ever before are making statements of style with pastel shades – especially pink – and we love it! Our pink Victorian front doors have seen unprecedented levels of demand and the colour – in all of its hues – is perfect for adding instant curb appeal.

Bespoke Victorian front door

Pretty In Pink

With pink having a major moment in interior design, it seems to have ventured to the exterior of our homes too. And why not? Pink is a versatile and fresh choice compared to neutral colours and does wonders to bringing a tired-looking home to life again.

There are, however, many shades of pink to choose from. It’s especially important to get the right shade of pink to perfectly capture the overall mood and style of your home. Popular choices are dusty, pastel and baby pinks as opposed to hot pinks or bubblegum pinks, but each one can beautifully complement features such as white pilasters, the greenery that frames an entrance and original monochrome tiling – a popular feature on pathways and doorsteps of Victorian homes.

Of course, pink in all its forms has many positive associations, signifying creativity, love, and passion. By using this playful colour on your front door, it adds personality and panache, boosting your homes curb appeal and makes stepping inside all the more inviting.

Shades We Love

1. Powder Pink

This beautiful pastel shade brings serious curb appeal to many stylish Victorian properties across London. The blush shade has a soothing finish and is the perfect accompaniment to warmer whites and polished chrome fittings.

period front door

2. Raspberry Seriously Ripples

A deeper shade with more rich undertones, raspberry pink offers a bold and moody vibe to any front door. If you’re looking for a sophisticated and luxurious finish to offer timeless style that will be envied by all guests and neighbours, consider letting raspberry ripple.

edwardian front door

3. Candy Pink

This deep dusky pink is playful and creative, beautifully complementing vivid greenery and brickwork perfectly. We especially love this shade on classic Victorian properties, especially when contrasting with tiled porches and entrance walkways.

london front door

4. Coral Pink

The latest trend in… pretty much everything. Coral Pink is a fresh and eye-catching shade that complements any property style beautifully. It’s also a great choice for springtime which will soon be upon us, as it contrasts perfectly with natural greenery and foliage. It’s time to get those hanging baskets up and out.

london door

Like what you see? Pink is a relatively easy colour to work with, but before you take the plunge, imagine your home in all seasons and consider the overall look in the area you live. It’s great to stand out, but worse to look amiss.

 

Bespoke Front Door – Our Services

Top-quality and well-designed front doors are essential in enhancing curb appeal, as well as the overall feel and style of your house. The best front doors are ones that are built with an almost poetic level of design but also fulfil all their functionalities smoothly and efficiently. So, whether you are going for a fancy design or just looking for a sense of practicality – the front door of your house will be the initial first and last impression to anyone passing by or entering your house.

London Bespoke front doors

Whether you are replacing an old door for a brand new one or moving into an entirely new home, Bespoke Front Door will facilitate with the highest quality front doors, offering professional manufacturing, expert design and flawless installation services within the London area.

Our Services

The primary concern to most of our clients is that the door must be the perfect combination of solid construction and beautiful design. You can rest assured, with Bespoke Front Door Services, the end result of our project will be the perfect balance of design and functionality.

Our services consist of the following:

  • Design Consultation

  • Professional

  • Installation

  • Survey
  • Bespoke Manufacture

  • Door Frames

  • Etched/Sandblasted Glass

  • Stained Glass

  • Painting

  • Finishing Process

Our Materials

At Bespoke Front Door, we use Accoya wood to build all of our doors, and for good reason too. Not only is the wood naturally beautiful and pleasant to look at, but it also offers endless advantages when it comes to durability, maintenance and insulation.

Accoya front doors are the best choice for any home as they take care of every single aspect that one would come to expect from a Victorian front door. Manufactured by ourselves, our doors flaunt supreme craftsmanship and unparalleled design.

Edwardian front doors

We take Accoya and forge it into something that not just becomes your go-to choice for resilience, but also style. In fact, our crafts and thrilling designs that are bound to not just integrate with the look of your house, but also enhance it. In order to marry quality with what it deserves, we offer the best quality hardware and locks to support the door.

Our doors are also eco-friendly, with Accoya wood being completely non-toxic and 100% recyclable, made from legally harvested wood from well-managed sustainable sources including FSC, PEFCTM and other regionally certified woods.

We can ensure, with our use of materials, your front door will stand the test of time – even throughout the harshest weather conditions. Our use of timber guarantees your front door will last at least three times as long as any other tropical hardwoods and materials.

London front door

Our Process

We would love the opportunity to come and visit you at your property, arranging a time and date that is convenient for you. During the visit, we can take a look at the door in question and discuss the project with you. We’ll provide you with a price quotation and also talk you through the process.

Please, contact us to make an appointment or ask any questions you may have.

The Top 5 Front Door Colour Trends of 2019

It’s usually encouraged to look beyond the external; it’s what inside that really counts, right? Yet, when it comes to home aesthetics, experts say it’s all about first impressions.

A stylish bespoke front door has the power to transform the overall look and feel of the front of your house, whilst immediately putting you in a good mood as soon as you get home.

One of the biggest factors in this is colour, and with the end of the year quickly approaching, we thought we’d revisit some of the most popular trending colours for front doors in 2019, and take a look at possible trends to expect in 2020.

1. Bright Yellow

Bright and bold colours on the London front doors were a major player over the summer months, adding pizzazz and vibrancy to your home’s exterior. Yellow, in particular, was a popular choice, and it’s easy to see why. The colour creates a warm and sunny look, greeting guests in a cheery fashion. And even though a bold yellow may not be a go-to choice for most, it can create a truly elegant look when used well. Think vivid pastel yellows to accompany white trims, or muted down tones to complement darker trims.

victorian front doors

2. Sky Blue

From rich cobalt blues to more pastel tones, blue has always been a popular colour for homeowners trying to move away from traditional blacks, whites and greys. Whilst vivid royal blues have a tendency to be a timeless colour choice throughout any season, we have come to love this sky blue tone, creating a brand new form of livelihood whilst maintaining a calm and collected vibe.

London doors

3. Classic Hardwood

It would be wrong to overlook the classics, that being traditional hardwood finishes. A hardwood door brings natural warmth to your home’s exterior, creating that much-loved feeling of home-sweet-home. Not to mention, it suits any exterior paints and can’t be mismatched throughout the changing seasons.

front door in London

4. Natural Tones

The love for more natural and subtle colour choices hasn’t got anywhere. Browns, blacks, greys and soft washed-out whites are still a massive trend after this year, especially when complemented with some greenery on the doorstep to really bring them alive. It’s the perfect choice if you’re opting for a more sophisticated and elegant look, and of course an easy choice for any colour palette.

Victrorian door

5. Christmas Red

As you’d imagine, a red Victorian front door is a massive hit if you’re looking to celebrate the festivities in style, especially when decorated with Christmas essentials like holly leaves or a wreath. But don’t be fooled, this colour makes any door a real show-stopper no matter the time of year, symbolising hospitality and a warm welcome!

period front door

It’s easy to see that 2019 oversaw a mixture of style and character when it came to enhancing that curb appeal, and apparently, it’s expected to be no different in 2020.

As we venture into next year, many creative homeowners are turning to natural shades of sage greens, olive and coral tones to complement their home exteriors – and with the unique and quirky results, it’s easy to see why.

edwardian front door

Through the Glass Objectively

As human beings, we pretty much come onto some new information every single day. There’s always something that we do not know and suddenly learn. One such thing that a lot of people tend to learn is that glass is not really classified as a ‘solid’ or a ‘liquid’. When you look at it technically, it’s right in-between those two states of matter and is commonly considered as an ‘amorphous solid’. At the same time, something we might know for certain might very well turn out to be wrong. For example, the idea that glass tends to become thicker towards the bottom with time is completely false.Window glass does not flow downwards due to the effect of gravity, rather the variations in thickness we see in old glass is because of the way they were made.

Front doors have an aspect of usage that they share with the fanlights above them: they are used to allow light into dark entrance hallways. The Victorian, Georgian, and Edwardian front doors all varied in the way that they used glass panels to line and decorate the doors. Leaded lights along with stained glass is a topic that we have previously discussed in ‘Pieces of Light’. Hence, now we will focus on the techniques that have been used to cut glass over time, as well as etched glass.

London door
A four panel Victorian front door with sandblasted glass

Grinding, cutting, and polishing are quite simply the oldest techniques you will find when it comes to the art of glass cutting. Rather than using large pieces of obscure glass, our glass using ancestors turned to these techniques to form the solutions they needed for their front doors, something that has appealed more to the 21st century audience. Patterns first began to be applied on clear glass with either acidic or abrasive procedures.

Sand-blasting gave the glass a frosted look with many tiny scratches made in the surface of the glass. Moreover, if any part of the surface happened to be protected by inking-on a design or by a vinyl stencil before the sand/acid are applied, a permanent pattern can be left on the glass by wiping away the ink or peeling back the stencil. This results in a a mixture of both clear and etched patterns. If a fully obscured panel was in use, sand-blasting the entire background was necessary. This was followed by etching various patterns using acid.

period door
A floral design which has been brilliant cut into sandblasted glass

Cutting glass beautifully is a craft of the highest proportion. Designs are drawn on the surface of the glass and the entire pane is then expertly maneuvered against a sharp and brutal cutting wheel. Grooves are then weaved in by cutting, each of them carefully following the design pattern lines. Traditional methods involved obscuring the glass by hand using a fine grinding paste. Brilliant cuts were now below the flat surface on top, keeping their sleek and polished feel. A great example of such unparalleled craft can still be seen in a variety of period front doors all across London.