How to repaint a worn wooden door

The Basics

A quick and easy way to revive a worn-down exterior door is by repainting it, and often this can be done with minimal preparation and without breaking the bank. Repainting your door can spruce it up and make the exterior of your house feel like home again. Improving and repainting your house’s front door can be finished in one day, with the bulk of the work completed in a single afternoon. In this blog article, we’ll show you the simple steps you should follow to get the perfect possible coating for your door, and how to do it quickly and efficiently.

Colour

Depending on your house’s location and style, the ideal colour for your bespoke front door can vary greatly, and it’s important to take some time to decide upon the perfect colour for you. While a bright, clean white can work with nearly every home and makes your house look beautiful and well-maintained, you might like a different tone or colour which matches the architecture and period of your house. Doing some basic research on door colours online can give you a good idea of a few great colour options for you!

Equipment and Preparing the Door

You’ll need some very basic and highly accessible equipment to get started with repainting your Victorian front door, and you might already have some of it at home if you’ve done something similar before. As well as wood paint for exterior surfaces in your chosen colour, and the crucial paint brush, you’ll need masking tape to protect areas you don’t want paint to touch, medium-grade sandpaper to prep the door, a roller and a tray, a cloth, and a flat-bladed scraper. To make removing the original coat easier, you can invest in chemical paint stripper.

Safety! Make sure to wear protective gloves, goggles and a mask if you’re dealing with dangerous paint.

When you’re preparing your door for repainting, you don’t have to remove all of the original coat right down to the timber. Instead, use medium grit sandpaper to scrape away a light amount of paint from the door. Be sure to rub in the direction of the wood grains. This will help the new layers of paint easily stick to the door and last longer. If you have chemical paint stripper, carefully but thoroughly cover the whole surface of the door with the stripper and ensure it seeps into any nooks and crannies. Again, this will ensure the old coat is removed effectively. When the stripper starts to bubble up, you know it is doing its job properly!

After leaving the door to rest for the recommended time on the package of the paint stripper, clean your flat-bladed scraper and cautiously scrape away layers of the original coat. Once the old paint has been removed fairly and equally across the door, neutralise the stripper by watering the door or using white spirit (this depends on the chemical stripper you used).

Use sandpaper held around a sanding block to erode away any thick areas of old paint and leave your door looking almost unpainted.

Applying the Paint

Painting your front door with your chosen colour is very simple, but getting the colour spread perfect across the entire surface can take just a little bit of time, so you should follow the steps closely to ensure you get the best coating.

Before applying any paint, give it a strong, thorough stir in order to mix up and fairly distribute the pigments in the paint, so that you won’t have any darker or lighter, or thicker or thinner, patches of coating on your door.

Once the paint has been all stirred up, don’t stall long before beginning the actual painting process. It’s recommended that you envision several imaginary “boundaries” on the surface of your door. Six or eight rectangular areas work best, and you should work on one at a top. Start from the top so that any tiny droplets of paint that run down don’t ruin any painting work you’ve already finished.

To get the blend right, paint carefully and lightly in the same direction as the wood grains and try to use an even coating on your brush each time. Go for equally lengthed strokes and try to blend each strip of paint into the one before it. Blend the patches into each other while the paint is wet so they have time to combine and cancel out any differences in pigmentation.

In simple terms, apply the paint cautiously and fairly across the door. You may need to do several coatings and we generally recommend this so that the paint is clearer, more resilient to weather and longer-lasting, so that you won’t have to apply a new coating any time soon. Depending on your type of paint, it could take anywhere from two to six hours for the paint to dry, but it’s usually okay to apply the next coating while the paint is only partially dry. Once you have applied enough coatings, leave the door to dry fully in a well ventilated space, and give it 24 hours just to be safe!

Conclusion

Well, there you go! Once the paint has dried, you can remove the masking tape, re-hinge the door and pack away your equipment. Grab a cup of tea and appreciate your handiwork! Ideally you should have a bold, clear and even coating of paint across your door’s surface with no blotches or scratches and none of the original coating of paint shaping through from behind. If anything looks off, it’s often fine just to take it off the hinges and give it another go over until it’s looking the way you envisioned.

Painting your front door can be a process but if done effectively with the right tools and the correct instructions, you can have it done within a day or two without facing any issues, and be left with a pristine, beautiful and good-as-new front door for your home sweet home!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s